Monday, April 20, 2015

New Work in Process See its Beginning Stage

I finally laid some paint down on one of the three pieces of wood I have been lovingly preparing.

Yesterday, I worked with two layers. I was not sure how the texture I applied underneath would work out. It's looking like a landscape painting at this point. We'll see what happens as it progresses.

I really love the process of experimenting with process. The experiment on this painting is laying down the texture in the foundational stages.

The texture experiment was combining spackling (the stuff used to fill nail holes on the wall) with gel medium. I wondered if it would be like light molding paste. I think it has very similar texture. It is less absorbent. I painted gesso over it so the absorbency left somewhat, which I like.

The process part is putting paint on and then taking some of it off and repeating the process. It gives the painting a sort of worn feeling producing less predictable outcomes. I like that process and also love the results.

What do you think so far?

Until Next Week

• Create art
• Appreciate art
• Buy art
Mary Gravelle
(Brianna Rush)
Sir Kitty
About the author: Brianna Rush (Mary Gravelle) is an artist and writer who resides in Sedona, Arizona with her beloved cat, Sir Kitty.

Monday, April 13, 2015

Is the Backside of the Art Piece Important?

Does the backside of an artwork deserve the artist's tender loving care? Or does it not really matter because no one is looking at it?

During the recent breakdown of my computer, I spent some tender loving care to the backsides of the three pieces of wood I mentioned in last week's post.

I have sanded, done a couple coats of gesso, sanded some more, and finished with a couple coats of Titanium white mixed with clear gloss medium. They await the gesso coats to the front, then for painting magic to happen. Ah, the tantalizing art-making process.

I have derived great satisfaction by paying attention to the backsides of these pieces. It's most likely due to the fact that they are wood. I don't pay that much attention to the backsides of a canvas. But, maybe I will next time.

I think it's all part of the process. Putting love into the art piece every step of the way feels good. I'm sure that love will be felt through the finished piece.

Head on over to my art website and see if you can feel the love emanating from my other paintings. Perhaps you would like to bring the love home?

So, what do you think? Is the backside as important or at least to some degree as important to the final art piece?

Until Next Week

• Create art
• Appreciate art
• Buy art
Mary Gravelle
(Brianna Rush)
Sir Kitty
About the author: Brianna Rush (Mary Gravelle) is an artist and writer who resides in Sedona, Arizona with her beloved cat, Sir Kitty.

Monday, April 6, 2015

Technology is a Great Distraction

I did not realize just how much time I spend on my computer until it blacked out on me on Friday. I was in the middle of signing up for yet another free webinar when the screen just went black. I could not get it to come back.

So what's an artist to do when the computer goes on the blink? I discovered that I had been paying more attention to techology than hands-on art making. Out came the art supplies along with a renewed vigor and passion for getting my hands dirty.

I sketched with soft pastels which I had not used in years. I painted some more on a painting I have been working on for months... apparently and getting distracted by the computer.

I took out the three plywood panels I had been wanting to do some mixed media work on. They received an experimental coating of spackle mixed with gel gloss medium to fill in the grooves and add texture.

I am writing this blog on my mobile phone. Please excuse any misspellings. I see no evidence that the spell checker is working.

So, what about you? Have you ever been distracted by technology? How have you overcome it?